The FCC launched the program in 2021 to help ensure that households “can afford the broadband they need for work, school, healthcare and more.”

NORFOLK, Va. — Almost half a million households in Virginia are at risk of losing high-speed internet due to the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) running out of funds in May, the White House said.

A spokesperson for the White House says one in seven households in Virginia are saving money on their internet bills because of the program. 

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) launched the program in December 2021 to help ensure that households “can afford the broadband they need for work, school, healthcare and more,” according to the agency.

The program was open to certain groups — including households with members with an income at or below 200% of the federal guidelines  — but applications closed in February due to the anticipated end of the program.

The program offered applicants a discount of up to $30 a month for internet service and up to $75 a month for households on tribal lands. The program also gave a one-time $100 discount for purchasing a computer or tablet, giving households with a lack of funds an opportunity to meet their technology needs.

A White House spokesperson said the Biden administration is calling on Congress to extend funding for ACP so that households can continue affording necessary internet connections.

FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks said in an interview with 13News Now, “The Affordable Connectivity Program is the most effective we’ve had in helping low-income Americans get online [and] stay online.” 

“Over half of the enrollees are military families… starting next month [those families] are going to have the very hard choice of either coming out of their own pocket to pay their internet bill or get disconnected,” Commissioner Starks continued. 

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